Lowell Youth Receive Tom Leggat Opportunities Fellowship Award

Leggat

From l-r: Emaly Horn; Holly Ferguson, daughter of Tom Leggat; Anne Irza-Leggat, daughter of Tom Leggat; Barbara Leggat, wife of Tom Leggat; Kenneth Hong.

 

Lowell, MA – Two Lowell youth, Emaly Horn and Kenneth Hong, were selected to receive the Tom Leggat Opportunities Fellowship Award for Youth.

“It was an honor to meet these two outstanding young people. Their stories were amazing and their ambitions were heartwarming. I can hardly wait to see what they do for our community,” said Jay Linnehan, executive director of the Greater Lowell Community Foundation.

Since the age of eight, Emaly has been a member of the Angkor Dance Troupe and a student of Khmer traditional dance. She’s currently studying Business Administration at Middlesex Community College. Emaly hopes to create a community event that will showcase the arts and empower community members, especially young people, to give back. She will use her award to support Elevate, an event she plans to host to showcase local dancers and dance groups.

Kenneth is attending Brandeis University and pursuing a double major in East Asian Studies and International and Global Studies. He has travelled to Cambodia to teach children English and to the Honduras to assist with health and housing assistance programs. His goal after college is to work with an NGO or government organization that strives to alleviate injustices in vulnerable populations. Kenneth will use his award to study in Beijing for a summer where he will participate in an intensive Chinese language immersion program.

The Trustees of the Theodore Edson Parker Foundation established the fellowship award at the Greater Lowell Community Foundation in honor of a former Trustee, Tom Leggat. The fellowship award recognizes Leggat’s interest in the advancement of youth as well as his dedication to the betterment of Lowell. Annually, the fund grants awards to promising young Lowellians, ages 17 – 21. The fellowship award provides opportunities that may transform the recipient’s outlook on life and encourage them to make positive, life-altering choices.

Examples of the kinds of opportunities the trustees have in mind include a post-graduate year at an independent school, challenging outdoors and wilderness programs, college-level summer school, overseas travel and homestay programs, year-long internships that have obvious enrichment potential, and foreign language acquisition and study courses. The fellowship award is not meant to cover conventional college costs.